14. Sep, 2020

You can never have too many signs on a Caravan Club site

14. Sep, 2020

For much of the time we were in town we found ourselves wearing our face masks. Yarmouth is a popular holiday destination for northern folk, and what northern folk have got right now are a number of towns and cities in varying degrees of lockdown due to their high Covid-19 infection rates. Little wonder given the conduct of people on the streets today, making no effort to socially distance whatsoever - thick, the lot of them. Couple that with irresponsible behaviour of young people and the multi-generation households (we used to call it overcrowding) of their Asian communities back home, it looks as if we're never going to crack it.

Lunch proved difficult as so many take-away establishments took cash, and we had no intension of buying food from staff who have handled both food and cash. In the end we had to settle for fish and chips at Harry Ramsdens, where our money was taken at one window and food was handled by different staff at a seperate window. We've had Harry Ramsdens before at other locations, but these were nothing special at all. The fish and chips we enjoyed back at Wells were far better, larger portions, and a lot cheaper.

So that was Great Yarmouth. I bet you thought it was just another British seaside dump. Well it is, but I wanted to make a quick visit to try and find the more interesting aspects of the town, though I have had to promise the Chef that we will never return.

If all goes to plan the next two days will each have their own new chapters to keep them of manageable size.

14. Sep, 2020
14. Sep, 2020
14. Sep, 2020

The South Denes area is also home to the Grade I listed Norfolk Naval Pillar, known locally as the Britannia Monument or Nelson's Monument. This tribute to Nelson was completed in 1819, 24 years before the completion of Nelson's Column in London. The monument, designed by William Wilkins, shows Britannia standing atop a globe holding an olive branch in her right hand and a trident in her left. There is a popular assumption in the town that the statue of Britannia was supposed to face out to sea but now faces inland due to a mistake during construction, although it is thought she is meant to face Nelson's birthplace at Burnham Thorpe. The monument was originally planned to mark Nelson's victory at the Battle of the Nile, but fund-raising was not completed until after his death and it was instead dedicated to England's greatest naval hero.